LOW-RESIDENCY MA IN CRITICAL & HISTORICAL CRAFT STUDIES

Research interview documentation with Catharine Ellis. Photo: Nick Falduto

Research interview documentation with Catharine Ellis. Photo: Nick Falduto

 
 

LOW-RESIDENCY MA IN CRITICAL & HISTORICAL CRAFT STUDIES

Craft has received an unprecedented level of academic attention during the past two decades. This burst in scholarship, historical study, theoretical investigation, and curatorial attention connects to parallel interest in the material, labor, and cultural practices in the visual arts.

This low-residency MA in Critical and Historical Craft Studies is the first program in the U.S. to focus its curriculum on craft history and theory and brings together a rotating faculty from multiple disciplines and varied cultural and global locations to broaden understanding of craft as a field of study.

Students will investigate research methods from archives to oral histories, public modes of presenting craft from street fairs to museum exhibitions, forms of writing in the field from exhibition reviews to academic journal articles, and alternative forms of documenting and communicating histories, such as podcasts, symposia, online platforms, and curricular development. The program challenges the boundaries of craft and spans media specific work to craft-like contemporary art, folk art to artisanal explorations. Research as an applied practice is the principle that will connect students’ project work in the Swannanoa/Asheville area to that in their own hometowns, offering training in primary and secondary source analysis and experience while studying and shaping a new field.

The Master of Arts in Critical and Historical Craft Studies accepts new students once per year for the semester starting in July.  Residencies are held twice per year, in July and January. Applications open in October and close the following March.